The American Revolution in South Carolina

David and Edeana at Ninety Six

In 2012, my husband David and I went to South Carolina to see where Michael Greissen Frein and the Palatines ended up. They were sent from Charlestown to the interior and received land along the tributaries of the Savannah River. The British settlers along the coast wanted them as a buffer against the native population.

The Palatines established the town of Londonborough, which they named for the town that had saved them. This town no longer exists so we visited the closest town in the area today, Edgefield. At the Old Edgefield District Genealogical Society, I purchased a book called The Palatines of Londonborough, showing a map with the 100 acres granted to Michael Greisen Frier (sic) on Log Creek.

Then at the Edgefield Library, we found a book of the Loyalists lists with the names of people who had served in the British militia. In the Stevens Creek militia, my husband recognized Michael Isom or Isham, possible spelling variations of Eisan. Evidently, Michael had changed his name to make it easier for his English-speaking neighbours.

Stevens Creek militia fought in the pivotal Battle of Kings Mountain located in North Carolina. We visited the site and found his name again (Michael Isom) in the book The Loyalists at Kings Mountain by Bobby Gilmer Moss.

monument-kings-mountainMichael was also at the Siege of Fort Ninety Six.

Stockade Fort Ninety Six

You can read more about these battles in my book The Loyalist available through Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=/144-2875787-0965667?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=The+Loyalist+Edeana+Malcolm) or on order at any bookstore.

If you’re in Victoria on September 12, 2018, come to the launch of The Loyalist at 932 Balmoral Road (First Metropolitan United Church).

The Loyalist Front JPEG

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